My 3 Favorite HIIT workouts right now

Hey all, happy #TipTuesday!

Today I will be talking about HIIT workouts, why they are so great, and sharing with you my 3 favorite HIIT workouts right now!

HIIT- High intensity Interval Training. If you are new to the term HIIT you’re in for a treat or curse (you decide)! HIIT is also synonymous with death BUT if you’re looking for a killer workout to maximize caloric burn that can be done in a short amount of time then you’re in the right place! (Excuse the morbidity! lol)

Image result for Funny HIIT memes

The basic structure of a HIIT workout is a period of high intensity work at about 80-95% effort followed by a period of low intensity work at 40-50% effort. The most common length of a HIIT workout can range from 20-60 minutes. Most of the time I incorporate a 20 minute HIIT workout 3 times per week but occasionally will add in a 45 min HIIT workout if I’m feeling a little crazy!

Some of the main reasons people choose HIIT workouts over regular endurance training is:

  1. Higher Caloric burn: the main reason there is a higher caloric burn with interval training is not only because of the high intensity work but also because you continue to burn calories hours after you complete your workout. This happens because after performing HIIT workouts your body experiences a wonderful thing called EPOC: Excessive Post-exercise Oxygen Consumption (aka after-burn) which is the amount of oxygen your body utilizes in order to restore itself back to homeostasis. Essentially your metabolism continues to work long after you complete your workout which equates to MORE CALORIES BURNED! Which is a wonderful thing.
  2. Cardiovascular Endurance: Just as any cardio exercise your heart will thank you! High intensity work also helps to improve endurance which will be very evident the more you perform HIIT workouts. Its like pushing your breaking point every single time you workout (hence the death references above).
  3. Fat loss without muscle loss: This one sounds too good to be true but let me tell you why this happens with HIIT workouts. HIIT has been shown to increase the size and number of mitochondria in the body. Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell which take in oxygen and nutrients and produces ATP (energy) for the body’s cells to utilize. This increase in mitochondrial density translates to more energy for our muscles to use during exercise AND rest.  In a study by Christopher Perry et. al they found that after a 6-week period of HIIT the ability for the body to burn fat for energy increased and the burning of carbohydrates decreased. To summarize HIIT is great for energy utilization and fat burning!

These are just a few of the benefits of HIIT workouts, now I will share with you my 3 favorite ways to reap these great benefits!

The first workout can be utilized in pretty much any kind of cardio exercise including: running, swimming, cycling, stairs, walking etc.

Workout #1: Pyramid

1 min warm up

10 sec sprint

20 sec jog

20 sec sprint

20 sec jog

30 sec sprint

20 sec jog

40 sec. sprint

20 sec jog (then reverse)

30 sec sprint

20 sec jog

20 sec sprint

20 sec jog

10 sec sprint

20 sec jog

Repeat for 20-60 min

Cool down 1 minute

 

This next workout can be completed using an aerobic step or a park bench.

Workout #2

High: Jump Squats

5 sec. rest

Low: Crunch

5 sec. rest

High: Step Up (Right Side)

5 sec. rest

Low: Bicycle Crunch

5 sec. rest

High: Step Up (Left Side)

5 sec. rest

Low: V-ups

5 sec. rest

High: Box Jumps

5 sec. rest

Low: Leg Lifts

5 sec. rest

High: Burpee Box Jumps

5 sec. rest

Low: Russian Twists

Repeat to desired length 20-60 min.

 

This last workout can be done anywhere with no equipment!

Workout #3

High: Jump Squats

5 sec. rest

Low: Push Ups

5 sec. rest

High: Jumping Lunge

5 sec. rest

Low: Bicycle Crunch

5 sec. rest

High: High Knees

5 sec. rest

Low: V-ups

5 sec. rest

High: Skaters

5 sec. rest

Low: handstand hold, plank, or wall plank

5 sec. rest

High: Burpees

5 sec. rest

Low: Russian Twists

 

Repeat to desired length 20-60 min.

 

Definition of Workouts:

Step Ups: Place right foot on step or bench, move your weight into the right foot and step up onto step or bench. Place feet side by side or bring left knee into chest. Repeat for interval then switch to other leg.

Box Jumps: Stand with feet together, squat low then jump onto step or bench with both feet. Either jump down with both feet or step down one foot at a time.

Box Jump Modification: Step up with right foot then left, step down with right foot than left. Alternate which foot you lead with.

Burpee Box Jump: Stand in front of bench or step. Complete 1 burpee then finish with jumping on box and jumping down. Repeat.

Burpee Box Jump Modification: Stand in front of bench. Squat then walk feet back to plank, walk back to squat, then step up on bench. Finish by stepping down from bench.

Skaters: Start in a small squat. Jump sideways to the left, landing on your left leg. Bring your right leg behind to your left ankle, and don’t let it touch the floor. Reverse direction by jumping to the right with your right leg.

Handstand Hold: Kick up into a handstand against a wall and hold.

Wall Plank: If you are working up to a handstand hold. Start by positioning yourself in a plank facing away from the wall. Begin to walk your feet a couple inches up the wall. Position your feet in a spot where you will be able to hold (The lower your feet the more ab engagement the higher your feet the more upper body/shoulder engagement)

Hope these are helpful! Let me know if you incorporate HIIT workouts or if you try them out let me know what you thought! I love hearing from you guys! ❤

Enjoy!

Lots of Love,

Andrea B Fit

 

References:

Perry, C.G.R, Heigenhauser, G.J.F, Bonen, A., and Spriet, L.L. (2008). High-intensity aerobic interval training increases fat and carbohydrate metabolic capacities in human skeletal muscle. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 33(6), 1112-1123.

Gibala, M. (2009). Molecular responses to high-intensity interval exercise. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 34(3), 428-432.

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